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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

Amanda Downum</p>

Hanukkah is one the wane and many folks are getting fat and/or drunk at the office holiday party (more of the former and none of the latter in my case, as my DayJob™ is in the mental health and addictions domain, so parties are typically dry), to say nothing of sending and receiving delicious gifts and treats, or gearing up for that big holiday meal at home. Some of us are busy with last minute shopping, and others are gleefully finding mysterious packages arriving by post or other carrier.

Meanwhile, amidst the other bits of frenzy that is typically associated with December, it’s the start of another week and on this particular Monday I’m pleased to tell you that Amanda Downum has dropped by to share a tale of a memorable meal. She’s a fantasy author perhaps best known for her Necromancer Chronicles (The Drowning City, The Bone Palace, and Kingdoms of Dust).

Amanda’s been shortlisted for the David Gemmell Morning Star Award, and the James Tiptree, Jr. Award, and nominated for the David Gemmell Legend Award and the Gaylactic Spectrum Award. Her newest book, Dreams of Shreds and Tatters, will be out from Solaris next May.

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

Tim W. Burke</p>

As promised last week, I’m back from the west coast, and if I have anything to say about it I won’t be doing any traveling for at least a month. I’m still fighting off a persistent cold that hasn’t quite managed to breach all of my defenses and lay me out, but nonetheless does have me feeling a bit logy. Extra sleep and fluids are helping, as is a return to my regimen of regular meals and exercise.

This week’s guest is Tim W. Burke, an author I’ve had the great pleasure of working with for more years than either of us is comfortable recalling, but I owe a lot of my growth as a writer to his tireless efforts smacking me in the head in response to some bumble in one or another of my early drafts. As such, I’m really happy to finally have him here on EATING AUTHORS.

Tim is primarily a horror writer of short stories, but he also has a background in writing sketch comedy. The combination has given his fiction both a macabre spin and a tremendous sense of timing. It’s a one-two punch that tends to stun you, time and again, with stuff you weren’t remotely expecting.

Last Spring, Tim’s first book, The Flesh Sutra, came out and posed such familiar questions as “can love transcend death?” as well as the less common “would you mutilate mankind for love?” There are layers and layers to this work, and I had the pleasure of seeing it unfold as each piece of it came through our workshop. I can’t share that experience with you, but I can recommend you head out and read the finished book.

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

Sunny Moraine</p>

And lo, after a week off, EATING AUTHORS is back. Again, apologies for the hiatus, but as nearly all authors know, deadlines, like rules, are made to be broken, and that’s pretty much what happened here. But that’s all in the past and we’re all about the future (except when we’re doing alternate history) so let’s move forward.

Our guest this week is small press author Sunny Moraine, who learned her craft by writing erotica before turning her hand to science fiction and fantasy. Which is not to say she’s turned her back on writing erotica, as her new novel, Labyrinthian (due out in January) so clearly demonstrates.

If you’re not familiar with her work, you might want to begin with Crowflight, the first volume in her Casting the Bones fantasy trilogy, or delve into some compelling nonfiction (she’s finishing her doctorate in Sociology) in her essay collection A Brief History of the Future. But before you click on any of those links, take a moment to learn about her most memorable meal.

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

I’m very pleased to be able to write that this weekly blog feature, EATING AUTHORS, has been going nonstop since its first episode way back on June 6th, 2011.

There have been a lot of guests, and a lot of meals. Don’t worry, this isn’t a farewell post. There are plenty of authors out there whom we haven’t eaten yet, and I’m waiting on hearing back from several of them for future episodes. But for right now, the cupboard is bare. That, and the minor details that my November is chock full. In addition to delivering a novel to Tor Books, I’m appearing at three conventions (one down, two to go), and traveling to the west coast to spend some time with family. So, for at least today (and maybe even next Monday), you’ll have to manage without EATING AUTHORS.

But I’m not going to leave you empty-handed.

First, because I’ve been doing this for so long, there’s quite an impressive archive of past meals to peruse. Here’s a link that will let you wander back in time and bask in the memory of meals past.

And if that’s not enough, let me direct you to another, similarly themed blog series, one that is run by my friend, colleague, and “Tor-buddy,” the talented Fran Wilde. Fran’s series is called “Cooking the Books,” and it’s where she talks to authors about food and their books. Follow this link to her latest installment and read her interview with Robin Hobb. Fran’s own first novel, Updraft, comes out from Tor in 2015, and with a little arm-twisting I’ll get her here on this blog to talk about her own most memorable meal.

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

Angelia Sparrow</p>

November is — to say the least — a turbulent month. Lots of you are banging your keyboards (or even your heads) to the beat of NaNoWriMo. Others are preparing for that annual American feast and family therapy day of Thanksgiving. And some are also hitting conventions. As for me, I just returned home from the first of three conventions this month, and I’m already wondering if I’ll be able to keep up the pace.

But the internet plugs along regardless of human frailty and weakness, and so too does the EATING AUTHOR blog feature. This week, we’re joined by Angelia Sparrow, an author who is most known for GLBT romance across a variety of genres. That’s not the sort of thing that we normally feature in this blog, and when I asked Angelia about it she explained that she writes books with strong sexual content because life has strong sexual content. She certainly has a point.

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

Danny Birt</p>

Danny is one of those people who wears a lot of hats (something I can certainly relate to). In addition to his work as an author, he’s also a composer, a music therapist, and a massage therapist. Or to put it another way, he has more than words on a page to reach his audience. Still, our focus here is on authors, and Danny is likely best known for his Laurian Pentology, the volumes of which I secretly believe were titled to confuse the crap out of readers. Case in point, the first book is Ending An Ending. Wait, what? Book two is Beginning. Okay… Book three, Beginning An Ending, which is followed by Ending, and finally we come to the fifth book, released just last spring, Beginning a Beginning. Admit it, you want him dead now, right?

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

Douglas Smith</p>

Halloween is just around the calendrical corner, that night when the border between worlds is at its thinnest and denizens from the other side cross over. Sadly, that’s the best segue I could come up with by way of introducing today’s EATING AUTHOR guest, Douglas Smith, who has crossed Canada’s less-than-spooky-border to be here.

Doug writes both non-fiction and fiction, novels and short stories. He’s a three-time winner of Canada’s Prix Aurora Award and been nominated for it nineteen times! He’s also been a finalist for the Sunburst Award for Excellence in Canadian Literature of the Fantastic, as well as several other nifty prizes, including the John W. Campbell Award.

In the non-fiction realm, he recently released Playing the Short Game, which may just be the definitive handbook for selling short genre fiction. And in a related bit of ‘paying it forward’, Doug is the keeper of the fabled, Foreign Market List, the best place I know to check out where to send a short story when you’re looking to see your work in another language. And if you have any doubts about trusting the list, let’s just note that Doug’s own work has appeared in twenty-five languages and thirty countries.

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

Anna Kashina</p>

One of the things I like about writers is how everything in their lives influences the work and shoes up (consciously or otherwise) in their fiction. Is it any wonder then that I prefer reading authors with full-blown careers in their histories, a range of educational experiences, and backgrounds in alternate cultures and languages?

All of which is my way of seguing to this week’s EATING AUTHORS guest, Anna Kashina, who has a doctorate in cell biology and a day job at the PENN”s School of Veterinary Medicine. Anna was born in Moscow, coming over to the USA in 1994. In addition to more recent work in English, she’s published novels in both Russian and German. Her latest book is The Guild of Assassins, the second volume in her Majat Code series.

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

Jon McGoran</p>

It’s another exhausted Monday, at least for me, as I spent the last three days at a convention. But I’m back, and in honor of coming home I’ve brought you a local talent for EATING AUTHORS. This week’s guest is none other than Philadelphia author Jon McGoran.

Jon has a more intimate relationship with food than most of our guests, having been an advocate for cooperative development, urban agriculture, and labeling of genetically engineered foods. As if that weren’t enough, he’s written a pair of thrillers dealing with genetically engineered food. In addition, he’s also authored an assortment of forensic crime thrillers under the name D. H. Dublin.

Among his other associations, Jon is a founding member of The Philadelphia Liars’ Club, a group that includes such folks as Greg Frost and Jonathan Maberry. Regardless of whatever else might be said of them, with Jon among their number we can at least hope they’re eating healthy.

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Originally published at Lawrence M. Schoen. You can comment here or there.

E. Catherine Tobler</p>

This week’s guest is E. Catherine Tolber and she occupies a special place in my heart, not because she was a finalist for the Sturgeon Award back in 2013 (she was), but because she bravely accepted the challenge to create a story for an anthology I was publishing. An anthology, I might add, with the gimmick that all the stories began with the same three writing prompts: watermelon, turtle, sex worker.

Having recovered from that experience, she’s gone on to write novels. Her first book, Rings of Anubis was released by Masque Books (a digital imprint of Prime Books) in late July and her second novel, Watermark, comes out tomorrow.

Many writers also know Elise not for her writing, but for her editorial prowess. She’s the senior editor over at Shimmer. So, if you’ve ever found yourself on the wrong end of one of her rejection letters, in addition to her own short fiction, you now have a pair of novels to study to learn how to get it right. And too, her remarks on her most memorable meal may also prove instructive.

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